Escalators and Elevator Supplier cousins

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    An escalator is a power-driven, continuous moving stairway designed to transport passengers up and down short vertical distances.Elevator Supplier are used around the world to move pedestrian traffic in places where elevators would be impractical. Principal areas of usage include shopping centers, airports, transit systems, trade centers, hotels, and public buildings. The benefits of escalators are many. They have the capacity to move large numbers of people, and they can be placed in the same physical space as stairs would be. They have no waiting interval, except during very heavy traffic; they can be used to guide people towards main exits or special exhibits; and they may be weather-proofed for outdoor use. It is estimated that there are over 30,000 escalators in the United States, and that there are 90 billion riders traveling on escalators each year. Escalators and their cousins, moving walkways, are powered by constant speed alternating current motors and move at approximately 1-2 ft (0.3-0.6 m) per second. The maximum angle of inclination of an escalator to the horizontal is 30 degrees with a standard rise up to about 60 ft (18 m).

    It is estimated that about ninety billion people ride escalators each year.An escalator is a moving stairway that transports passengers up and down the floors of a building. It is generally constructed in areas where elevators would be impractical. These areas include shopping malls, airports, transit systems, trade centers, hotels, and public buildings.

    It is estimated that there are at least 33,000 escalators in the United States. About ninety billion people ride escalators each year. Escalators and their cousins, moving walkways, move at approximately 1 to 2 feet (0.3 to 0.6 meter) per second. The maximum angle of inclination (slope) is 30 degrees with a standard rise of about 60 feet (18 meters).

    An escalator is a very clever invention. Escalators can be built in the same physical space that stairs would occupy, and yet they have the capacity to move larger numbers of people. Except during periods of heavy traffic, there is generally no waiting time to get on an escalator. They can be used to guide people toward main exits or special exhibits. Escalators can also be constructed outdoors and provided with the proper covering in case of bad weather.

    Escalator inventors

    The invention of the escalator is generally credited to Escalator Company. Seeberger who, as an employee of the Otis Elevator Company, produced the first step-type escalator manufactured for use by the general public. His creation was installed at the Paris Exhibition of 1900, where it won first prize. Seeberger also coined the term escalator by joining scala, which is Latin for steps, with a diminutive form of "elevator." In 1910 Seeberger sold the original patent rights for his invention to the Otis Elevator Company. Although numerous improvements have been made, Seeberger's basic design remains in use today. It consists of top and bottom landing platforms connected by a metal truss. The truss contains two tracks, which pull a collapsible staircase through an endless loop. The truss also supports two handrails, which are coordinated to move at the same speed as the step treads.